New Perspectives: The Polio Years in Texas

Online Program

April 23, 2020 12:00pm - 1:00pm

The Story of Texas is always changing, explore a historic epidemic in Texas to put current events in context.

Program Details

Join Dr. Heather Green Wooten for a livestream talk on her book The Polio Years in Texas, which explores the response to the epidemic from the 1930s to the 1950s. Polio had sweeping cultural and societal effects in Texas but also led to advancements that changed the medical field nationally.

Program is FREE to the public and will be available post-livestream on the Bullock Museum YouTube channel.

About the Presenter

Dr. Heather Green Wooten is an adjunct assistant professor for the Institute for the Medical Humanities (IMH) where she teaches courses relative to the history of medicine and medical ethics. Her research specialties include the social history of epidemics and disease outbreaks, racial and gender disparities in medicine and American medical biography. Dr. Wooten’s first book, The Polio Years in Texas: Battling a Terrifying Unknown was a recipient of the Mary M. Hughes Research Fellowship by the Texas State Historical Foundation, the T. R. Fehrenbach Book Award by the Texas Historical Commission, and the Ottis Lock Endowment Award. Recent publications include Old Red: Pioneering Medical Education in Texas (Texas State Historical Association Press) and Skilled Hands: Surgery at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston, co-authored with Dr. William Henry Kellar. Her latest endeavor involves writing the 50-year history of the Graduate School for the Biomedical Sciences (GSBS). In 2018, Wooten was appointed Project Director for the Handbook of Texas Medicine, a five-year project that will create the first state-based online encyclopedia of medical history in the United States.

Educators, to receive CPE credit email Education@TheStoryofTexas.com.

Support for the Bullock Museum's exhibitions and education programs provided by the Texas State History Museum Foundation.

Image credit: Texas Theater Closing. San Angelo, 1949. Image courtesy of West Texas Collection, Angelo State University.