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Bullock Museum media and press coverage

2014

08/27 Texas travels: Bullock Museum tells story of Texas
The Revolution Theater tells of the fight for Texas independence from Mexico.

Texas travels: Bullock Museum tells story of Texas

You can't miss the Bullock Museum. Located in downtown Austin just north of the Texas State Capitol, the front entrance to the Museum is marked by a towering 35-foot bronze star presiding over the Lone Star Plaza. Inside the sunset red granite building, three floors and 34,000 square feet of exhibition space tell the many stories of Texas through a continually changing collection of artifacts. IMAX® Theatre and immersive 4D films as well as hands-on experiences and special exhibitions connect Texans and visitors from across the globe to the history and cultures of the Lone Star State. Margaret Koch, the Museum's Deputy Director says, "Whether you are interested in the history and culture of native peoples, Spanish colonial history or the accounts of settlers who came to Texas for land and opportunity, or special exhibitions of a more modern era, there are hundreds of intriguing stories that can be found within our walls."

From the American Indians who inhabited the land 13,000 years before Europeans arrived, to the bloody struggle for independence, to the first footprint on the moon, the Bullock Museum brings to life the grand as well as the intimate stories of how Texas became Texas. Beginning in October of 2015, the exhibition, La Belle: The Ship That Changed History, presents the story of French explorer La Salle's ill-fated journey to establish a colony in North America through hundreds of artifacts,  interactive experiences, and an original 4D film. The wreckage of his ship La Belle, sunk in Matagorda Bay in 1686 and excavated during the 1990s, will be rebuilt timber-by-timber inside the Museum, in full view of visitors.

You really can't miss the Bullock Museum.

 

 

08/19 Exhibit at Bullock Museum Memorializes Texas' Fallen in Vietnam
Patriot Guard Riders honor the arrival of 3,417 dog tags as part of Texas Vietnam Heroes Exhibit

Exhibit at Bullock Museum Memorializes Texas' Fallen in Vietnam

A military procession passed under the Bullock Museum's iconic bronze star to deliver the Texas Vietnam Heroes Exhibition, which honors fallen Texans. Members of the military were joined by veterans, Boy Scouts, Texas State Troopers, and Patriot Guard Riders in the moving ceremony. Once inside the lobby, the procession presented an American flag to Linda Kaplon, the widow of fallen serviceman Corporal Phillip Felix Kaplon, Jr. The exhibition featured 3,417 dog tags with the name, rank, service branch, and date of loss for each Texas soldier.

The Texas Vietnam Heroes Exhibition was on display at the Museum until September 9, 2014.

08/18 Traveling Vietnam Heroes Exhibit Arrives in Austin

Traveling Vietnam Heroes Exhibit Arrives in Austin

"We accomplished something meaningful for a group of people that weren't recognized for the service they gave to their country," said Robert Floyd, with the Vietnam Veterans Monument.

The Texas Vietnam Heroes Exhibition was created to honor the soldiers who died during the Vietnam War. The exhibition—displaying 3,417 dog tags displaying name, rank, service branch, and date of loss— pays tribute to each soldier lost during the conflict. "It's part remembrance, part honor and part healing," said Vietnam veteran Chuck Collum. "Honor and respect. We will honor and respect our fallen. They will not be forgotten."

The Texas Vietnam Heroes Exhibition was on display at the Museum until September 9, 2014.

07/18 Psychedelic Acid Trope
Bullock, Briscoe, and LBJ explore our recall of the Sixties

Exhibits at the Bullock, Briscoe, and LBJ explore our recall of the Sixties

In a testament to the lingering impact of the 1960s, three Austin institutions offer a visit to the psychedelic past. At the Bullock Museum, The 1968 Exhibit features the instantly-recognizable 1960s den, complete with a set of World Book encyclopedias and Walter Cronkite on the news. It's the other object in that familiar space— a Huey helicopter— that reminds us that the Vietnam War was really the first conflict to come into our homes and join us on that couch in the den.

Curated by the Minnesota History Center, The 1968 Exhibit tells the personal and national stories of war, civil rights, devastating loss, cool music, hot trends (avocado and harvest gold, anyone?), humans on the moon, and much more. Interactive displays, games, video lounges, and over 150 artifacts recreate the pivotal twelve months of 1968.

The 1968 Exhibit was on display at the Museum until September 1, 2014.